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Wild Bird Scoop, Issue #718
February 07, 2013
Welcome

to the February 2013 edition of the “Wild Bird Scoop"

Hot Topic

Getting Enough Food

News & Reviews

February is National Bird Feeding Month

Quips & Queries

Where Do Wild Birds Sleep At Night?

Bird Bluff OR Bird Believable?

What About Owls?

Wild Bird Ballyhoo

Bet You Didn’t Know This?

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It is our goal at the Scoop-on-wild-birds-and-feeders.com to help you and your family enjoy the beauty of nature, through discovering the fascinating world of our feathered friends.

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Thanks so much and please read on and enjoy! Judy

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Here is what’s in this issue of “Wild Bird Scoop".

Please contact us if you have any questions or comments.

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Hot Topic

Getting Enough Food

    Getting enough food is the biggest quest in a bird’s life. For that matter it is a pretty big deal on every living creature’s plate.

    Different types of wild birds satisfy their need for food in different ways. They all have specific habits and physical make up that determine how and what they will eat.

    We are all familiar with the migratory habits of many species to find food. Here in the northern regions of North America we would be very surprised to see Bluebirds hopping through snow covered branches. Bluebirds are primarily insect eaters and there are just not enough active bugs exposed during the season of frigid temperatures in the north. The Woodpeckers are still always hammering away and able to find either insects or sap during this time but Bluebirds just do not have the equipment to pursue bugs in the same manner.

    So it is important to know what kind of food you should serve up in what kind of feeder during different seasons of the year.

     chickadee at snowy feeder photo
    Chickadee at Snowy Feeder

    Right now in the north we can attract a wide variety of birds by simply putting out a feeder with black oil sunflower seeds. The birds you are most likely to attract first are Chickadees, Red-breasted and White-breasted Nuthatches, Goldfinches, House Finches, Juncos. If you don’t have many trees then you can drop off the first two species (Chickadees and Nuthatches) on the list.

    If you place your sunflower seeds in a feeder that allows birds to eat facing forward, such as a chalet feeder then you have a good chance of attracting Cardinals. But if the sunflower seeds are in a tube feeder with its short stubby perches where the birds have to turn their heads to the side to eat, then you will not likely have Cardinals coming to dine.

    The Juncos will eat at the chalet feeder but will likely be seen on the ground under the feeder picking up seed that has fallen from the feeder.

    Junco on top of peanut feeder photo
    Junco on Top of Peanut Feeder

    A platform feeder is a favourite of all as it is easy to see the food and predators at the same time. It also provides great viewing for the bird watcher too.

    Suet will also give many wild birds the energy boost they need to keep warm in the cold months and the energy during early spring for mating, nest building and raising young. Suet is easy to provide and does not need a special feeder as a net bag such as type that onions are sold in will do just fine.

    Your assistance in feeding wild birds during winter months will be greatly appreciated and could mean the difference to their survival.

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News & Reviews

    February is National Bird Feeding Month!

    If you would like to celebrate this great hobby during this special month then I have the perfect way for you to do this. Participate in the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) hosted by the Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society.

    It happens twice per year and one of those times is from February 18th to 21st. It is very simple to participate. Here is how you do it:

    1. Just spend some time on one of those days or every day of the event.

    2. Make a list of all the birds you see and record the number of each type of bird you see at each time.

    3. You can do it in your own backyard, your neighbourhood somewhere or out in the country.

    4. Click on the appropriate link below and enter your counts:

    The Great Backyard Bird Count for US residents.

    The Great Backyard Bird Count for Canadian residents

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Quips & Queries

    Sometimes I am asked where wild birds sleep at night during the winter. Follow the links below for the answers:

    http://www.wildbirdscoop.com/roostingboxes.html

    http://www.wildbirdscoop.com/dead-trees.html

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Bird Bluff OR Bird Believable?

    Owls only hunt during the night, right?

    Well, it turns out this is not always true.

    For example the Snowy Owl which lives in the artic has no choice but to hunt during the light in the summer months as there isn’t a night.

    Actually there are many other types of owls that can be seen hunting during the day like the Great Gray Owl, Short-eared Owl and Barred Owl. This is especially necessary during long cold months as it takes more food to produce the energy needed to keep warm or to feed their young in the spring.

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Wild Bird Ballyhoo

    A bird’s foot is an interesting thing. We tend to humanize wildlife and talk about their body parts like ours.

    But a bird’s “foot” is actually very different from ours. Birds walk on their toes and their foot actually begins at their feathered belly.

    Not how we usually think of it is it?

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And that’s "The Scoop" for now! Hope you enjoyed this issue, until next time…

Happy birding! Judy

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Please contact us if you have any comments or questions. We’d love to hear from you and we will respond as quickly as possible.

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